Tuesday, March 28, 2017

RAISING RYLAND

RAISING RYLAND
OUR STORY OF PARENTING A TRANSGENDER CHILD WITH NO STRINGS ATTACHED
By: Hillary Whittington with Kristine Gasbarre

Hillary and her husband Jeff's first child, daughter Ryland, was about 14 months old before they realized she was profoundly deaf.  Soon after, she had surgery to have cochlear implants which gave her the gift of sound.  Once she learned to speak she began telling her parents she wanted to wear boy clothes. She had always liked boys toys and her parents had always had  to struggle with her to wear dresses or anything feminine.  By age 3 she told her parents she was a boy and she wondered why God had made her look like a girl when she knew she was a boy.  What would you do?  Ryland's parents, especially her father, struggled to figure out what to do.  Hillary began researching and began to understand that their daughter was transgender.  One thing Hillary discovered through her research is the suicide rate among transgender people is 41%.  She and her husband did not want that to happen to Ryland so they made the difficult decision to let their daughter live as her true self which is male.  This book is very eye opening if you have questions about transgender people.
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library
 
 

Monday, March 27, 2017

THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS MOVIE


THE LIGHT  BETWEEN OCEANS DVD

I just watched this movie over the weekend after having read the book.  I loved the book and was happy to find that the movie very closely followed the story line of the novel.  The acting and scenery are fabulous in this movie.  I would definitely recommend this movie.
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library

Thursday, March 23, 2017

PAIN, PARTIES, WORK: SYLVIA PLATH IN NEW YORK, SUMMER OF 1953


PAIN, PARTIES, WORK
SYLVIA PLATH IN NEW YORK, SUMMER 1953
by Elizabeth Winder

After reading this new nonfiction book, I now plan to go back and reread The Bell Jar.  In 1953, Sylvia won a spot with Mademoiselle Magazine to be a guest editor.  This program began in 1939 and was a chance for college women to be part of the popular college issue.  There were 19 coeds chosen, out of thousands, the summer of 1953.  The girls were all put up at the (un air-conditioned) Barbizon Hotel for Women.  While in New York for the month of June, they not only worked on the magazine but got free tickets to concerts, plays, dances, etc. The book also describes the terrible, searing heat of that summer. This is a fascinating read.  It's a snapshot of the hopes and dreams and daily life of women in 1953.  Sylvia uses this seminal experience as the outline for her famous novel, The Bell Jar.  If you are a Sylvia Plath fan, you will thoroughly enjoy this book!
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library

Monday, March 20, 2017

THE GOLDEN HOUR


THE GOLDEN HOUR
by T. Greenwood
The backstory for this novel is the rape of thirteen year old Wyn and the conviction of her classmate as the rapist.  Fast forward to the present.  Wyn, an artist, and her artist husband have a young child and a marriage in trouble.  When Wyn learns that the guy that raped her is getting a second trial, she packs up her daughter and flees to a friend's deserted vacation home on an island in Maine.  In the basement of the dilapidated home, Wyn finds canisters and canisters of undeveloped film.  She begins to get the film developed which leads to another mystery.  I found this book to be too convoluted.  I never really did understand how the photos from the old canisters played into the story of the rapist and his retrial.  I kept waiting for the book to have a climax but it never happened.  I would only rate this book a 3.
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library

THE STRANGER IN THE WOODS


THE STRANGER IN THE WOODS, THE EXTRAORDINARY STORY OF THE LAST TRUE HERMIT
by Michael Finkel

I was so memorized by this nonfiction book that I sat down and read the whole book in one sitting.  In 1986, 20 year old Christopher Knight left his home in Massachusetts and drove to Maine.  He abandoned his car (with the keys left inside) and began hiking into the forest with just a few items.  He lived alone in the woods for twenty-seven years until he was finally apprehended for stealing food from a camp for disabled children.  The author of this book befriended Knight after he was captured and learned how he was able to survive all that time.  It was amazing because Knight never had a campfire in all those years, even in winter weather of -20 degrees F., because he figured he would be discovered if people saw the smoke.  He was not self sustaining though.  He regularly stole from summer cabins and the nearby camp.  He used his ingenuity to the utmost to survive and remain alone.  It is just hard to wrap your mind around someone doing this or rather wanting to live this way.  To me this was an absolutely fascinating book!
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

THE EDUCATION OF WILL


THE EDUCATION OF WILL; A MUTUAL MEMOIR OF A WOMAN AND HER DOG
by Patricia B. McConnell

Being a dog lover and owner, I had high hopes for this book.  Unfortunately, I thought this book had too much of the author's backstory of drama and not enough about the dogs.  I felt sympathy for the author but her repetition of the facts of her story were just too much.  Her dog, Will, also seems to experience a great deal of anxiety and has many issues.  The author is an animal behaviorist so a lot of the book does deal with her strategies in dealing with pet problems.  Will, however, just seemed so over the top and I give her credit for sticking with this dog throughout his many ordeals.  I would only give this book 2 out of 5 stars.
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library

Monday, March 6, 2017

RESCUING PENNY JANE


RESCUING PENNY JANE
by Amy Sutherland


This book is a comprehensive behind the scenes look at shelter dogs and how they get adopted out.  Not too long ago, many more dogs were euthanized than adopted out.  Today that trend is finally reversing.  Many shelters are now considered "no kill" shelters where 10% or less of pets are put down (only those too ill to be rehabilitated.)  The author of this book owns 2 rescue dogs and volunteers at the shelter in her town.  She also traveled across the United States touring shelters, talking to people, finding out success stories (and some not so successful stories.)  I think people are finally starting to understand that dogs are usually surrendered through no fault of their own.  Many dedicated people are also out there trying to help shelter dogs find forever homes.  I know I have rescued 2 dogs and both of them are wonderful dogs!
Reviewed by Mimi @ Genoa Branch Library